New US dollar coins

new-dollar-coin-front-thumb.png

As you may have heard, the U.S. Mint has been encouraging Americans to start using the new dollar coins rather than $1 bills. In fact they are going to be spending about $12 million promoting the project. Since coins last a lot longer than bills, the Federal Reserve estimates that replacing dollar bills with coins would save the country over $500 million.

The presidential dollar coin program is similar to the wildly popular state quarter program from a few years ago. The new dollar coins started to make their rounds in February of 2007. The US Mint will continue to roll out four new ones each year until 2017.

Schedule for the new dollar coins

  • Feb 15, 2007 1. George Washington, 1789-1797New Dollar Coin - front
  • May 17, 2007 2. John Adams, 1797-1801
  • Aug 16, 2007 3. Thomas Jefferson, 1801-1809
  • Nov 15, 2007 4. James Madison, 1809-1817
  • Feb 14, 2008 5. James Monroe, 1817-1825
  • May 15, 2008 6. John Quincy Adams, 1825-1829
  • Aug 14, 2008 7. Andrew Jackson, 1829-1837
  • Nov 13, 2008 8. Martin Van Buren, 1837-1841
  • 2009 9. William Henry Harrison, 1841
  • 2009 10. John Tyler, 1841-1845
  • 2009 11. James K. Polk, 1845-1849new US dollar coin - back
  • 2009 12. Zachary Taylor, 1849-1850
  • 2010 13. Milliard Fillmore, 1850-1853
  • 2010 14. Franklin Pierce, 1853-1857
  • 2010 15. James Buchanan, 1857-1861
  • 2010 16. Abraham Lincoln, 1861-1865
  • 2011 17. Andrew Johnson, 1865-1869
  • 2011 18. Ulysses S. Grant, 1869-1877
  • 2011 19. Rutherford B. Hayes, 1877-1881
  • 2011 20. James A. Garfield, 1881
  • 2012 21. Chester A, Arthur, 1881-1885
  • 2012 22. Grover Cleveland, 1885-1889
  • 2012 23. Benjamin Harrison, 1889-1893
  • 2012 24. Grover Cleveland, 1893-1897
  • 2013 25. William McKinley, 1897-1901
  • 2013 26. Theodore Roosevelt, 1901-1909
  • 2013 27. William H. Taft, 1909-1913
  • 2013 28. Woodrow Wilson, 1913-1921
  • 2014 29. Warren G. Harding, 1921-1923
  • 2014 30. Calvin Coolidge, 1923-1929
  • 2014 31. Herbert C. Hoover, 1929-1933
  • 2014 32. Franklin D. Roosevelt,1933-1945
  • 2015 33. Harry S. Truman, 1945-1953
  • 2015 34. Dwight Eisenhower, 1953-1961
  • 2015 35. John F. Kennedy, 1961-1963
  • 2015 36. Lyndon B. Johnson, 1963-1969
  • 2016 37. Richard M. Nixon, 1969-1974
  • 2016 38. Gerald R. Ford, 1974-1977
  • 2016 39. James E. Carter, Jr., 1977-1981
  • 2016 40. Ronald W. Reagan, 1981-1989
  • 2017 41. George H.W. Bush, 1989-1993
  • 2017 42. William J. Clinton, 1993-2001
  • 2017 43. George W. Bush, 2001-

Oh, and by the way, there were a bunch of errors in some of the Washington and Adams coins last year. If you find one and there is no lettering on the edges, you should hang onto it. Some have been put on Ebay and have sold for over $100.

I prefer dollar bills over coins

So far, the dollar coins have not quite taken off like the quarter program. It isn’t really surprising to me. As a minimalist wannabe I strive for the thinnest wallet possible. Dropping huge coins into it doesn’t exactly help me reach my goal. And for those guys whose wallets resemble more of a cube than a rectangle, I can’t imagine they really want to add to it. Maybe the ladies would like some extra coinage?

The funny thing about this to me is that there are still over 92.7 million uncirculated Sacagawea dollar coins that were created in 2000 and 2001. It reminds me of when my mom yelled at me for opening a new bag of potato chips, when there was 2-day old half full bag in the pantry. Why not use what we have sitting in a shed somewhere rather than creating more?

A USA Today article about the new dollar coins stated…

One-quarter of the 2,513 adults surveyed online by Harris Interactive last March said they had seen the dollar coins. Only 13% favored the coins over paper dollars.

What about you – do you prefer dollar coins over bills?

Technorati Tags: New US dollar coins, New dollar coins

email










FTC Disclosure of Material Connection: In order for us to maintain this website, some of the links in the post above may be affiliate links. Regardless, we only recommend products or services we use personally and/or believe will add value to readers. Read more here.

24 Comments
Add a comment
  1. Fun for collecting…but mainly useless. I definitely don’t want coins in my wallet, and I normally don’t like coins jingling in my pockets. I think the population will reject them in the same manner as the Sacagawea coins. But then again…maybe not…the fanny-pack could come back for good! :P

    • Cheryl Thoma

      Where is the In God we trust, am I just missing it. I wouldn’t want it for that reason. That should always be on our money

  2. Speaking of fanny packs, now that was a beautiful invention gone sour ;)

  3. Dollar coins, quarter coins, all coins get the stink. They smell. You handle them and then you smell, too. Dollar bills not as much, and debit cards even less. I predict that until the dollar decreases in value to where pennies go away… these coins will be for collectors, too.

  4. The only way other countries have gotten the public to use dollar coins is by withdrawing the paper counterpart. Likely this would hold true in the US as well, no matter how much they spend on advertising.

  5. Coins are more expensive for businesses to process too. Our bank will not let us bring coins to the branches. We have to have them picked up by courier and they are processed at a central coin processing center, causing a delay several days before they are deposited. We do it once a month to save $$.

  6. @Carolyn
    that is a great point – if those additional expenses are disbursed throughout the US economy, I wonder if there really would be any savings advantage to using them at all?

  7. The part of this that totally DISGUSTS me is that fact that the phrase “In God We Trust” has been moved to the edge of the coin. This is a slippery slope that we have allowed to happen with little or no debate. I wasn’t even aware of it until recently. The next step will be removal completely. It makes me sick.

  8. Lance,
    that is interesting – I had heard that it was removed from these new coins, but thanks for sharing that – I haven’t seen the new coins, so I didn’t know it was on the edge… But I do agree with you, its amazing how our nation is running from the one who was behind our creation!

  9. While I lived in Germany, I grew quite accustomed to the 1 and 2 euro coins, as well as the many smaller coins they used. I actually missed them when I came back to the states! Yes, maybe it’s more change in your pocket, but you never had to worry about vending machines, parking meters, etc. rejecting those overused bills that cannot be read. I can’t wait for the dollar coins to be more widely used.

  10. What happened to “In God We Trust” on the coins?

  11. I have not seen the new coin. But I heard that “In God we trust” was taken off it. It that is the case I will not use them at all and encourage others not to either. It really breaks my heart to see our nation trying to eliminate God from so many different things in our country, It’s a shame.

  12. Bonaparte

    I think the new Presidential dollars are great! I use them in vending machines and carry them with this neat change-holder that I bought online. Walmart gives dollar coins back for change.

    Check out the change-holder at http://www.portsou.com

  13. The inscription is hidden on the edge, where no one will notice it.

    Refuse the coins.

  14. Daniel Schumann

    I live in Australia, but was home in Ohio for 7 weeks and I could not even get one on the new coins fron the bank. We have a friend in Australia who love to collect the quarters and wanted the new dollar coins. In Australia, they have 1 & 2 dollar coins which are ok. I think the move to a more cashless society would be better and save even more than printing and coins.

  15. The coin doesn’t say “IN GOD WE TRUST”…

  16. New pictures from the US Mint show “In God We Trust” on the front next to the term of the president featured.
    See link:
    http://www.usmint.gov/mint_programs/$1coin/index.cfm

  17. just shows that we are coming to the end
    Because they took in God We Trust

    It really should say in Money we trust

  18. KimAileen

    Check your facts. I think you’ll be as happy as I am to know that “In God We Trust” is engraved on the EDGE of the coin along with E PLURIBUS UNUM and the date the coin was released. Go to SNOPES for detailed photography and other unfounded rumors regarding the new coins. http://www.snopes.com/politics/religion/dollarcoin.asp The coins released in 2009 have the same information engraved on the BACK of the coin which is more traditional. If you can get your hands on one with the inscription on the side, hold fast because these little pieces of engraved metal are already becoming priceless to collectors.

  19. DeWitt Mullins

    This is another case of the Government acting without thinking. The “savings” that they have figured over paper money will be dwarfed by the cost of the new coin, particularly the cost of promotion to an acceptance level by the public due to one omission on the coin, “In God We Trust”. That attempt by the Treasury to get God out of the American monetary system will cost them dearly. Collectors may drool over coins that are unpopular and hopefully will be recalled but I see it as a sign of the Revelation. If our money does not bear the mark of God, who’s does it bear, and how can we buy or sell without the mark of the beast if the Treasury gradually takes all of the money with In God We Trust on it out of circulation. Thank God for Debit Cards (for now anyway).

  20. DeWitt Mullins

    Just read the comments above. If the inscription is on the side where it is hard to read or goes unnoticed it is only a matter of time before it disapears all together. God has been legislated out of too much in America already. I love my country but I love the Lord more. Its time the government understood where average Americans stand, not just the Gays or the athiest or anyone else that feels that minority rights superseed the rights of the majority.

  21. I would prefer coins for USD $1, $2, and $5. Better for the economy, and better for the environment; they last several decades instead of several months and are recyclable. So, I always withdraw $1 coins rather than paper.

    On the downside, I dislike the composition of the current $1 coins (thin manganese brass coated copper) at they tarnish very fast.

  22. glaser burkhardt

    The new State quarters and bills that are uncirculated don’t have “In God We Trust”, on them.Again America is being changed by Socialist People in America.

Add a comment

*

Name: Your best email address: 5 subscribers No spamming ever. Unsubscribe at any time. Email Marketingby GetResponse